Independent Reading

The 8 Components of Balanced Literacy. Week 4: Independent Reading

Balanced Literacy.

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This 8-week series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Independent  Reading.

Week 1:  We discussed Read Alouds.

Week 2: We discussed   Shared Reading.

Week 3:  We discussed Guided Reading.

This week we jump into

INDEPENDENT READING.

Let’s talk about INDEPENDENT Reading.

DEAR, SSR, Silent Reading, RAH, etc..  Whatever you call it…we call it

INDEPENDENT READING!

Independent reading is a time when students read text with little or no help from the teacher. They are usually at their seats or in comfortable places around the classroom.

In my classroom they may be at their desk, on a stool, in a rocker, or even…under a table or desk. Only one rule… You MUST be reading!

IMG_9620-2B-25281-2529.JPG

Check out FLEXIBLE SEATING

Independent reading is children’s reading of text — such as books, magazines, and newspapers — on their own, with minimal to no assistance from adults. It can consist of reading done in or out of school, including purely voluntary reading for enjoyment or assigned reading for homework. There are strong associations between independent reading and reading achievement, and many researchers believe that independent reading plays a key role in the development of reading fluency (speed and ease of reading), vocabulary, background knowledge, and even spelling. Not surprisingly, motivation also is associated with independent reading; children who are interested in and motivated to read tend to do more independent reading. Unfortunately, children with learning disabilities in reading often do not read independently, because they tend to find reading effortful, may have trouble obtaining books at their reading level, or may have generally negative attitudes toward reading as a consequence of repeated failure.

Reading Rockets

IR involves the full participation of the teacher. This means the teacher is instructing, scaffolding, and conferring with students (Reutzel, Fawson, & Smith, 2008) during IR time. For example, the teacher educates students in how to select appropriate books, scaffolds student understanding of specific text types, and confers with students to assess their understanding of what they have read.

Literacy Worldwide

Make the TIME for Independent Reading

If you’re really looking for independent reading to be successful with your students, you’ve got to commit class time to it. Students always see what we value by how we approach it during class. And if we want to be certain students get something done, we have to do it during class.

How you make this time is up to you. Elementary classes that tend to have students all day long can have a special fixed time each day allocated to independent reading. Middle and high school classes can allot a small portion – perhaps 10 or 15 minutes – of a class period towards independent reading each day before putting the book away and focusing on the day’s lesson. Others might prefer to wait until Friday and spend the whole class period reading that day.

Teachhub

How to Get Kids to Read Independently at Home?

Each WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY  they bring their RAH folder back.

I have them choose 2 books…YES…2 books to put in their folder.

( I place a pile 20 or so, of books at each level … *disclaimer…right now I have 5 Guided Reading groups…

I group their PILES of books at the Guided Reading group level…

So they really are taking home books at THEIR reading level.

Just a little teacher  “nudge”  in the right direction!

They choose two books, put them in their envelopes, 

and put them in their cubbies.

They keep them for 2 nights…hence bringing them back WED. & FRI. 

We change them for two NEW books … and here we go again!

How to Get Kids to Read at Home

Tips to Bring Independent Reading Into The Classroom

So, how do you realize the benefits of independent reading in your own classroom? Here are a few ideas:

  • Build independent reading time into each student’s day whether in school or at home. Class time is especially effective since it provides students a distraction-free time in their day to read.
  • Offer a selection of books at each student’s reading level and from different genres and help them find books they might enjoy.
  • Let each student make a reading list of five books they want to read and set reading goals.
  • Find creative ways for students to share books with one another, including things like book clubs, video projects, blogs or discussion time.

Educationdive

Jennifer Serravallo answers ’10 Questions About Independent Reading’

Independent Reading Activities

If you’re like most people, after reading a really good book you want to tell someone about it; you want to share.  Let students share their excitement over books!

Here are 8 activities that will engage students in sharing what they read.

  1. Illustrate an important character or event in the story.
  2. Create an advertisement to promote the book.
  3. Have students pick out words they are unfamiliar with and make a word wall.
  4. Make a bookmark that represents the theme or main idea of the book.
  5. Write a question to the author or a character in the book.
  6. Have them illustrate their favorite part of the story.
  7. They can write a letter to a character.
  8. Have them make a connection to a life experience.

In summary…

  • Allow students CHOICE..choice of books & choice of reading area.
  • Build in time for independent reading EVERY day..model reading, too!
  • Debrief their independent reading time. DISCUSS it!

Tools that may be helpful:

Book Boxes for Independent Reading

Book Boxes for Independent Reading

Gallon Zip-Lock Bags for Independent Reading books.

Gallon Zip-Lock Bags for Independent Reading books.

HOW TO GET BOOKS for Independent Reading?

Use SCHOLASTIC BOOK CLUBS, Donor’s Choose, and/or garage sales to add to YOUR classroom library for independent reading books.

From Striving to Thriving

No More Independent Reading WITHOUT SUPPORT

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

So…Leave me a comment… What does  INDEPENDENT READING look like in YOUR classroom?

 

Mega Giveaway

Back to School Mega GIVEAWAY!

We have $350 to GIVEAWAY!

Anyone INTERESTED??? 

 I thought YOU might be!

Mega Giveawawy

Back to School MEGA GIVEAWAY

 

*** BACK TO SCHOOL GIVEAWAY ***

 
It’s nearly that time! We hope you have enjoyed your summer!
To make this season a little easier this year, myself and a team of
amazing teachers have grouped together to gift ONE awesome, lucky
teacher with a TPT gift card, Target gift card, and an Amazon gift card!

PRIZES INCLUDE :
1 x $150 TPT Giftcard,  1 x $150 Target Giftcard,  1 x $50 Amazon Giftcard


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Raffle CLOSES: Saturday 18th August 2018 12am

GOOD LUCK!!!

 

Wendy   1stgradefireworks

Guided Reading Tbale

The 8 Components of Balanced Literacy- Week 3: How to teach Guided Reading

Balanced Literacy.

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This 8-week series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Guided  Reading.

Week 1:  We discussed Read Alouds.

Week 2: We discussed   Shared Reading.

This week we jump into GUIDED READING.

Let’s talk to the EXPERTS about Guided Reading.

Gay Su Pinnell and Irene Fountas  Video by: Kemberly Meriwether

Guided reading is subject to many interpretations, but Burkins & Croft (2010) identify these common elements:

  • Working with small groups
  • Matching student reading ability to text levels
  • Giving everyone in the group the same text
  • Introducing the text
  • Listening to individuals read
  • Prompting students to integrate their reading processes
  • Engaging students in conversations about the text

The goal is to help students develop strategies to apply independently. Work focuses on processes integral to reading proficiently, such as cross-checking print and meaning information, rather than on learning a particular book’s word meanings. (For example, a student might see an illustration and say “dog” when the text says puppy, but after noticing the beginning /p/ in puppy, correct the mistake.) During guided reading, teachers monitor student reading processes and check that texts are within students’ grasps, allowing students to assemble their newly acquired skills into a smooth, integrated reading system (Clay, p.17)

READ WRITE THINK

The Guided Reading Table

Guided Reading Table

What does a guided reading lesson look like?

It varies based on reading level, but here’s a general structure for a 15-20 minute lesson.

  • Students re-read familiar texts for several minutes. This is a great way to promote fluency!
  • For just a minute or so, the students practice previously learned sight words.
  • The teacher introduces the text.
  • The students read the text out loud or silently while the teacher coaches. They do not take turns reading; instead, each child reads the text in its entirety.
  • The teacher leads a discussion of the text.
  • The teacher makes 1-2 teaching points.
  • If time allows, students do a few minutes of word work or guided writing.

The Measured Mom

Scholastic has 4 Tips for Guided Reading Success:

  1. Establish Routines. Routines for The Lesson format ( this helps with TIME constraints ), routines for when Guided reading happens, AND routines for what the OTHER students are doing while the teacher is teaching at the table.

2. Make SMART  text choices. The text should provide multiple opportunities for students to apply strategies and skills you have identified for the group.

3.  Dive into INSTRUCTION. Before, during & after reading.

3.  Assess and Be Flexible.   Your groups should be fluid and should change as your students’ instructional needs change. That’s where informal and formal assessments come in handy.

Scholastic.com

Tips for Creating Miniature Guided Reading Anchor Charts

Conversations in Literacy

The Next Steps In Guided Reading

Kindergarten Chaos

 

Does guided reading stress you out? Are you having a hard time getting everyone back to your table and teaching tthem meaningful lessons? This post will offer a simple approach to guided reading that helps your to make a plan, organize yourself, and stay relatively stress free. Perfect for first, second and third grade reading teachers. {1st, 2nd, 3rd, grade, elementary school, reading, guided reading}

Learning Lessons  With Amy Labrasciano

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

These Guided Reading resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

The Next Step Forward in Guided Reading: An Assess-Decide-Guide Framework for Supporting Every Reader

Amazon

 

Reading Strategies (Amazon) 

So…Leave me a comment… What does GUIDED READING look like in YOUR classroom?

 

 

 

STEAM

We jumped into STEAM…and the building began!

Build It..and they will come!

They said STEAM.

They said kids will build in STEAM.

Build WHAT?
Has ANYONE seen the Kevin Costner Movie…
FIELD OF DREAMS?
Build it and they will come.

Field of Dreams

On MY top 10 of ALL TIME GREATS!
Yes…I love baseball  (  GO  SF  GIANTS!  )
But
This is SOOOO  much MORE!
It’s about never giving up.
Keep trying.
When others tell you that YOU are CRAZY…
BELIEVE IN YOURSELF!
I  LOVE  THAT!
SO How do I give my 6-year-old FIRSTIES
a chance to EXPLORE their dreams?
To “think OUTSIDE the BOX”?
To go the extra mile?

Recently, I have been exploring STEAM.

30 minutes of FREE PLAY???
NO.
I don’t call it that!
( Even if it makes my OCD heart skip a beat!)
STEAM!
Now…this is NOT your
“Teacher KICKS BACK while kids DO WHATEVER THEY WANT!”
This is a structured time of the week
( ANY DAY WILL WORK)
where kids get “tools” to BUILD!
They make a PLAN, they put their plan into action,
they learn from failures and their successes, and they do it again!

During STEAM, I tell them they are building a city.

We brainstorm
(chart with pictures – Lots of EL students )
ALL of the things WE want
in a PERFECT city!
(They want LOTS of PARKS…grass…Ice cream stores…etc )
And then I group them into groups of 4.
I switch them each week.
I get out their “TOOLS”…
Toy blocks

Toy Blocks for kids to build STEAM cities.

Blocks…Garage Sale & “FRIENDS” donations
Building tools for STEAM

MArshmallows and toothpicks for ENGINEERS!

Their FAVORITE!
Toothpicks & marshmallows.
Engineers in ACTION!
Math blocks

Math Blocks for STEAM

Math Blocks…Want to learn about “sides”, “corners”, “flats”, “rolls” ?
Use them!
Lincoln Logs

Lincoln Logs for STEAM

Oldie but a goodie!
They LOVE to follow the picture DIAGRAMS!
Math Manipulatives

Math Manipulatives to use for STEAM

Get out your MATH Manipulatives…and let them PLAY!
NO! Not “PLAY” 🙂  …BUILD!
Build a CITY!
Cubes

Cubes for STEAM

CUBES!
Legos

Legos for STEAM

And the ALL TIME  FAVORITE…..
LEGOS!
Giant TUB!
I ask Parents to donate a small baggie of their “extras” from home.
We add them to the tub!
I may need a LARGER tub! 🙂
And so… don’t forget.
If you want to encourage kids to DREAM BIG!
We have to let them do it!

Create, problem-solve, share, plan, explore.  STEAM

I hope the future leaders of our country can do ALL of it!
(Better start teaching them HOW!)
And remember…you need to be a part of it also.
I  do.
We do.
You do.
WOW!
Excuse me.
I have some “creating” to do with those legos!
Here are some classroom resources to help

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Shared Reading

The 8 Components of Balanced Literacy. Week 2: Shared Reading

Balanced Literacy.

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This 8-week series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

This week:   Shared  Reading.

Last week we discussed Read Alouds. Week 2 is about  Shared Reading.

How is shared reading different from a readaloud?

Shared reading, involves quite a bit of pausing to teach or engage kids in practicing a skill. When doing a readaloud,  go through the book a bit more quickly, stopping less frequently.

The other most important difference between shared reading and a readaloud is that during shared reading, kids have their eyes on the print. During a readaloud, you may show the pictures to students, but they are not usually able to see the words clearly. Since students can see the text during shared reading, you are able to teach things like decoding more easily.

Learning At the Primary Pond  

Shared reading is a part of the balanced reading model (read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading).

This is a 15ish minute block of time within that model that should be practiced daily.  Simply stated it’s the “We do.” part of the gradual release model.  This element is a crucial.  It’s time for the teacher and students to practice together.

Mrs. Richardson’s Class

The READ ALOUD is done BY the teacher FOR the students.

Shared Reading is done WITH the students.

A Poem, a Big Book, A chart. Any text where the teacher and the students can see the text, and read it together.

Shared Reading

Shared Reading vs Read Aloud 

Education.com

It is important to teach what “really matters” connected to a shared text. “We always want students to leave each reading experience enriched by the language and the text because of the shared approach, so we shouldn’t find hundreds of vocabulary words and instructional opportunities in a single text.

Some of  the many benefits of shared reading

  • building vocabulary
  • developing understandings of story structure
  • demonstrating reading strategies
  • entire class reads a common text
  • all read the large text
  • high engagement

There are many types of print for Shared Reading.  Big books, charts, and poetry are some resources for teachers to read WITH students.

Here some great educators share their resources.

What is Shared Reading?

What is Shared Reading?

Learning at the Primary Pond

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

The Teaching Texan

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

Mrs. Wills Kindergarten

The main goal of shared reading is to engage students with the text. It is to share a reading experience. Everyone can read together and then participate in a rich discussion, writing, or response to the text.

In summary, a Shared Reading is a reading experience where both teacher and students read a large text, together. A chart, a poem on a smartboard, or any other BIG text, where the teacher reads WITH the students using self-questions and think aloud reading strategies. The goal is to model fluent and expressive reading. The students  INTERACT with the text while reading WITH the teacher and then through discussions, writing, and/or thinking for themselves.

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

These resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

kids_with_cape_0962b8be-b9ca-4b14-9881-cfd7cf03286a_1024x1024

HamerayPublishing

I hope YOU are prepared to practice DAILY  Shared Reading in YOUR classroom!

Stay tuned for next week… Week 2 Guided Reading.

Please share with friends.

Leave me a comment…How do YOU use Shared Reading in YOUR classroom?

Read Alouds

The 8 Components of Balanced Literacy. Week 1: Read Alouds

Balanced Literacy.

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This 8-week series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

This week:   READ  ALOUDS.

As defined by education.com, the teacher reads aloud various types of text. She often models her thinking aloud as she reads. The students participate by listening to the text and the teacher’s thinking strategies and then trying some of them out by talking with partners. The teacher reads the text, therefore taking away the visual sources of information, so that students can focus on meaning and structure.

The READ ALOUD is done BY the teacher FOR the students.

Marie Clay (1991) writes that when teachers read aloud to students “meanings can be negotiated in discussion before, during, and after the story reading” (p.171). Reading aloud to students should include think-aloud or interactive elements and focus intentionally on the meaning “within the text,” “about the text,” and “beyond the text” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2006, p.33). Read aloud, as part of the gradual release of responsibility, feeds naturally into shared, guided, and independent reading as teachers demonstrate for students the ways the reading process works (Burkins & Croft, 2010).

Among the many benefits of a read aloud, Rog (2001) lists the following:

  • building vocabulary
  • developing understandings of story structures
  • supporting developing connections between print elements
  • encouraging high levels of understanding
  • teaching the reading process in a meaningful context
  • modeling fluency
  • motivating students to read

There are many types of print for Read Alouds. Classroom library books, Big Books, chapter books, charts, and poetry are resources for teachers to read TO students.

Here some great educators share their resources.

first-grade-read-aloud-opt-400x634

15 Read Aloud Books for First Grade

Erica at what do we do all day    

has a list of First Grade Read Alouds.

firstgradereadalouds

19 Perfect Read Alouds

Mia at the Pragmatic Mom also has a list.

Pinterest has many fun and exciting ideas!

The main goal of a read aloud is to engage students with the text.

To create their own thinking based on their life connections,  and discuss the text with peers. Each will bring their own comprehension based on their life experiences. As they learn to communicate their thoughts and understanding to others, their own comprehension will expand. The teacher has an opportunity to draw the students INTO the book. Use your storytelling techniques, be the characters, create the world using your voice, and open the doors to new adventures.

Slide1

How to PLAN Read Aloud Lessons

Paige from Our Elementary Lives shows us HOW to plan a Read Aloud Lesson.

And there are MORE. Click the links below for more information on READ ALOUDS.

Upper Elementary Snapshots

The Inspired Apple

Intentional Homeschooling

A Dab of Glue Will Do

In summary, a READ ALOUD is a book, a chart, a poem on a smartboard, or any other text, where the teacher reads TO the students using self-questions and think aloud reading strategies. The goal is to model fluent and expressive reading. The students then INTERACT with the text through discussions, writing, and/or thinking for themselves.

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

These resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

51Sj5mMOXJL._SY498_BO1,204,203,200_

The Ultimate Read-Aloud Resource

The Ultimate Read-Aloud Resource 

516PEG6FPDL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

The Read-Aloud Handbook

The Read Aloud Handbook

I hope YOU are prepared to practice DAILY Read Alouds in YOUR classroom!

Stay tuned for next week… Week 2 Shared Reading.

Please share with friends.

Leave me a comment…How do YOU use Read Alouds in YOUR classroom?

Print

Read Aloud for 15 Minutes

Read Aloud

 

guided math data

Using Math DATA for Guided Math Groups

How do we use MATH data for Guided Math Groups?

I teach MATH.
I “think”
I teach math well.
 
BUT..
 
HOW  DO  I  KNOW  IF  THEY  “GET  IT”???
 
How do I know if they have mastered ( or internalized )
the concept,
 
BEFORE  THE  TESTING  BEGINS???
 
Student at a computer.

Students work with technology during Guided Math groups.

 
 
I mean…it’s NOT..
I REPEAT…NOT
always about 
 
THE  TEST!
 
But.. my kiddos WANT to do well!
 
Even in First Grade, they KNOW!
 
They KNOW TESTS COUNT!
 
Whether or not we like tests or don’t,
 
TESTS  COUNT!
 
And so..
 
How do I know if they are ready?

How do I use Guided Math data to help students?

 
Girl with cubes.

Students work with manipulatives during guided math .

Boy with cubes.

Boy counting place value cubes during guided math.

 

 
 
I have a district purchased math curriculum 
I am required to teach.
 
We use  Expressions.
 
Math Expressions

Math Expressions is my district curriculum.

 
 
I have a pacing guide from my district to use as a “tool”
to
Keep ME on track.
 
Mostly to ensure I have taught the required concepts for 
THE TEST!
 
I am NOT a fan of WASTED WORKSHEETS!
 
SOME…I LIKE!
SOME…I DON’T!
 
So …now what?
 
I NEED DATA!
 
SHOW ME WHAT YOU KNOW!
 
And so..
THEY DO!
 
Here is my Lesson on
ADDITION using 3 digits:
 
whole class math lesson.

Whole Class math lesson with photo

 

Whole class math lesson.

Whole class math lesson with groups.

 

Independents math groups.

Independent math practice during guided math groups.

 

Independent math

Independent math becomes data for guided math groups.

 

Differentiated math data.

Differentiated math. The data becomes our groups.

 

So..  NOW  WHAT?
 

Now I have LOTS of DATA  (Student information)

 to put students into

  guided MATH groups!

I have noted students who need scaffolding in:
number sense
subitizing
numbers beyond 10
addition
grouping numbers
writing numbers
expanding numbers
place value
shape recognition
 
AND ALL OF THIS..
 
with 2 pieces of white paper & some crayons!
 
But…  
in the next few weeks
 
when we
 
“TEST”
 
My kiddos will “GET IT”!
 
I know they will!
 
If YOU need any help with 
 
Check out …
 
Monkey Math

Monkey Math

 

Monkey math

Monkey Math preview

 

Monkey math centers

Monkey math centers

 
for  GRADE  1
 
See how I use it  HERE  and  HERE
 
AND
 
Buggy Math

Buggy Math for Second Grade

 
For  GRADE  2
 
See how I use it HERE
I also have MORE MATH Products…
 
Math Talk.

Math Talk. Math Discussions.

 

Place Value

Sticks and Stones Place Value

Thanks for following!
 
Here’s a FREEBIE for YOUR TIME! 🙂
ks  and  Stones
Strategy Book

FREEBIE…Strategy Book for Making 10

 
ENJOY!

I am a CLIP ART Addict!

I confess…I am a CLIP ART Addict!

I am sure there is a 12 step program somewhere.
A “group”  where  I can
“beat” my obsession.

I AM ADDICTED TO CLIPART!

Others go to sales for the products.
I go for the clipart.
Holidays, kiddos, animals, backgrounds, frames…
I LOVE THEM ALL!
And so..
Here I go again!

DJ INKERS is having a SALE!

 DJ Inkers is so excited to celebrate Back to School with YOU! The fun begins 7-18-18  with fabulous teacher FREEBIES & incredible SALE!  You’ll find adorable classroom clip art, fabulous fonts, educational printables & smiles… ALL ON SALE for the celebration!

{Click here to sign-up for their email list,

 so you won’t miss a thing!}

DJ Inkers is giving away  a

Top Of The Class CD ($39.99 value)

to ONE LUCKY WINNER!
And I am adding
Johnny Appleseed’s APPLES ARE THE BEST
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I have a FREEBIE for YOU!
I used
and
in my  FREEBIE!
DJ INKERS ‘Top of the Class’
So now…
Who wants to win CLIP ART???
I DO!  I DO!

Enter the rafflecopter  HERE!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Rafflecopter  July 18-22,2018

 

Book Clubs for Book Study

Book Clubs Reading Groups

Reading Groups? 

 LOVE THEM!

BUT….
My High Kiddos 
don’t want to meet with me
 as often as my others…
so, enter

BOOK CLUBS

 

 



We have grouped our BOOK CLUB kids into groups of six.

 Each has the same book.
They have worked with the packet with me first during guided reading.
Model, model, model. 
Then …
RELEASE THE KRACKEN!



 I mean …release the firsties!

 

Book Clubs work as a team 
to help each other read the story,

 have a “LITERATURE” discussion ( the hard part),
 and then they complete the packet TOGETHER.

 

 



 Do they copy…yeah ( get over it) .
They ARE Learning from each other.
 I have heard the BEST discussions ever 
( and I wasn’t involved in it!).

 They really CAN do it.
They enjoy the new packet.
 I give them a “reward certificate” 

LUNCH with the teacher 
when the TEAM completes their packets
 AND 
 give a 
GROUP ORAL REPORT 
on their book!

They want MORE!
 ( I try to switch the Book CLub groups , depending on the book level).
It takes them about 1-2 weeks to complete it.

 We have a “core” reading series 
we HAVE TO DO are highly, most decidedly will, are

encouraged to do, first.

 SO… Book Club is their UA (small group) time.

So here it is!  Check it out! Good for ANY story or book.

BOOK  CLUB

 

 

 

Tips & Tricks

 

  • When students are independent readers, begin BOOK CLUBS
  • Hold students accountable
  • “Chunk” their work time ( I have them work for 15-20 minutes)
  • If needed…choose a LEADER to begin the discussions.
  • All club members need the same book.
  • Have booklets ready ahead of time. When they finish one…start another!

 

Check out these resources to help with reading & writing in YOUR classroom! 🙂

If you like it..PIN IT! 🙂

Book Clubs for Book Study

Book Clubs for Reading Comprehension!

Balanced Literacy

In a Balanced Literacy Classroom, the Guided Reading table is THE COMMAND Center.

What is YOUR favorite time of the day?
Before lunch?
Recess?
 
Mine is…

GUIDED   READING!

 
guided reading table

The MAGIC happens at the Guided Reading Table

In a BALANCED LITERACY classroom,  

this is the place where “MAGIC” happens!
The “AHA!”..the lightbulb…whatever you want to call it.
 
Last year I got rid of my 
TEACHER  DESK.
 

This is my 

Guided Reading

CENTRAL COMMAND.

 
 
 
The guided reading table where I do small group reading as part of my balanced literacy.

Guided Reading Table

 
Then I added stools from IKEA.
My kiddos LOVE IT!
 
I use flexible seating stools at the guided reading table.

The central area of any Balanced Literacy classroom…the guided reading table!

 

My next favorite

Guided Reading”accessory”

from by

BFF…

AMAZON!

 

Brewster Wall Pops 

WPE99065 Peel & Stick Calypso Dry-Erase Dots

 with Marker

 
Vinyl clings make seating areas The guided reading table where I do small group reading as part of balanced literacy.

Dry erase dots!

 
I put  BIG teal dots on my table!
 

 

Vinyl clings make seating areas The guided reading table where I do small group reading as part of balanced literacy.

We write on our dry erase dots during guided reading,

 
My kids write on them!
 
 

 

Vinyl clings make seating areas where I do small group reading as part of balanced literacy.

Using dry erase dots on our guided reading table for word work, comprehension, and vocabulary.

 
After we read… then
we write questions on them
 and then change seats to answer them!
Musical Chairs!
 
 
Vinyl clings make seating areas where I do small group reading as part of balanced literacy.

Students are highly engaged during guided reading.

 
They LOVE it!
Write & WIPE! 
 
The BEST!
 

I use my 

BALANCED LITERACY BINDER

for Guided Reading Resources.

 
ALL of the elements needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom in one resource.

Balanced Literacy Resource Binder. ALL of YOUR Guided Reading resources in ONE BINDER

 

ALL of the elements needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom in one resource.

The components of Balanced Literacy.

 
I use it
to assess kids reading levels,
 to group them with like skills,
 and to teach them AT THEIR LEVEL.

Guided Reading 101

 
Now a couple of things I have learned “on the way”…
The reading strategy element needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom.

Teaching reading strategies is vital to a Balanced Literacy reading program.

1.  Guided Reading is NOT independent reading time!
They read to themselves (READ TO SELF) at a different time of the day.. we do it after lunch.
 
2. Guided Reading is NOT a time for a LONG teacher LESSON!
 I only have them for 15-20 min.
  Always give them a skill or strategy they can use NOW!
 
Your goal is to create INDEPENDENT READERS… do not enable them to wait for YOU to do the reading.
 
3. You DO NOT have to read a BOOK every day!
 This is not the time for HOW MANY BOOKS have you read?
 
  My lowest reading group needs PHONEMIC AWARENESS. If you don’t know your letter sounds…it’s really HARD to read.
 
My “bubble” kids ( those that have some skills, but need support and practice to move over the “BUBBLE” into INDEPENDENT READERS) need phonics support to be able to solve reading problems, independently!
 
So Guided reading should be called
 

GUIDED  LITERACY

 
Meet them at their level.
Give them a “take away” that they can use TODAY.

Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

 
I also use FRIDAYS for assessments ONLY.
 
NO GROUPS!
 
Student assessment recording sheet needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom.

Assessment drives the guided reading groups.

 

Student assessment recording sheet needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom.

Teacher “HOW TO” pages for guided reading assessment.

Student assessment recording sheet needed for a Balanced Literacy classroom.

Assessing skills for guided reading groups.

I do one-to-one RUNNING RECORDS.
I do fluency assessments.
I do letter, spelling, word family, & phonics assessments.
BUT…
 
Don’t  “DAWDLE”…
don't dawdle...run fast

Turtle and rabbit running FAST!

 
Make it quick. Not a “story” time.
Try to get the most BANG for your buck.
 
Suggestion:
 
Start with your middle groups.
The “BUBBLE” kids.
They will be moving the fastest.
 
Next.
 Alternate assessments between your highs & lows.
 
Your highs probably will make continued growth with “less” support…they came in with strong foundations or they wouldn’t be HIGH!  
Don’t forget about them. Keep them connected with BOOK CLUBS,    Writing, and LOTS of COMPREHENSION.
 
My low babies. You can’t practice TOO MUCH.
When they become “done”…distracted, unable to focus, etc.
CHANGE IT UP.
Interactive writing, phonics games, reading with “finger pointers”, etc. etc.  
 Change the game…not the content.
 
Here is a Sight Word FREEBIE for YOU to get started !
FREE Sight Word game to practice reading

FREE sight word game for guided reading.

 

Remember…

1. Assess your students. Check data frequently.

2. Sort students into groups ( 4-6 student per group is perfect!)

3. Reteach skills and Strategies.

4. LET them READ! They need PRACTICE!

 
So I LOVE the guided reading table.
 
LOTS of learning goes on there.
 
BUT ALWAYS, ALWAYS, remember…
 
IT STARTS WITH