Category Archives: Reading | Writing

Reading, Phonics, Comprehension, Word Work, and Writing

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

We get a “Literacy” DO-OVER : Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop

And a FREE BALANCED LITERACY Resource to get you started!

2023 is the Year of LITERACY!

Because 2022 was so BAD….we get  DO-OVER!

We get a “LITERACY ” do-Over”!

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Read to the bottom

for a FUN FREEBIE

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

Ready to UPDATE your literacy block? 

Balanced Literacy: Here is your NEW YEAR’s PLAN!

*DISCLAIMER…  I know the Science of Reading is the NEW “go-to” for teaching Reading.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT! I am learning. I have been teaching reading to FIRST GRADERS for 30+ Years. AND I AM ALWAYS  LEARNING. SO… I hope YOU are open to new ideas & “reusing” OLD ideas to help our “littles” learn. If this helps YOU – Yeah! ( Jan. 2022). 

The Why? The What? and The How?

This Week:  Writer’s Workshop

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop

This week we jump into Writer’s Workshop!

You can’t THINK of Writing without thinking …

LUCY  CALKINS and others.

During the writing workshop, students are invited to live, work and learn as writers. They observe their lives and the world around them while collecting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing well-crafted narrative and expository texts. Students receive direct instruction in a minilesson, during which the teacher explicitly names a skill proficient writers use that is within reach for most of the class, then demonstrates the skill and provides students with a brief interval of guided practice using it. Students then have time to write, applying the repertoire of skills and strategies they’ve learned, while receiving feedback through one-to-one conferences and small group instruction designed to move them along trajectories of development.

Lucy Calkins

The four components of Writer’s Workshop are:

  1. The Mini-Lesson
  2. Writing
  3. Conferring
  4. Share

Let’s discuss each part.

1. The Writing Workshop Mini-Lesson

 The mini-lessons are short, focused, direct. They typically fall into the categories of classroom procedures, the writer’s process, the qualities of good writing, and editing skills. The lesson is 5-10 minutes of directed instruction. Start off your writing lessons by brainstorming ideas. This lesson will help set the stage for a year of writing by giving students a place to find ideas to put in their future writing pieces. If you use interactive notebooks or writing folders, each student needs a place to put ideas, writing pieces in process, and finished works.

Rockin Resources

Writer's Workshop

Tips & Tricks for Writer’s Workshop

Where the Wild Things Learn

Launching Writer's Workshop

Launching Writer’s Workshop

Teaching with Crayons and Curls

 

2) The Writing in Writer’s Workshop

In my first grade classroom, my students have a folder, a journal, and a Pictionary ( pictures and words ). At the beginning of the school year, we practice writing.

Our routines include:

  1.  First,  they draw a picture with your PENCIL. ( No crayons, yet )
  2. Next, they write the words. After one month of school, we are now beginning to write 2-3 sentences. NO— THEY ARE NOT PERFECT—-  We are just beginning the process.
  3. Last, they may color their picture …unless they would like to ADD MORE. And then they can ADD MORE words to match the picture!
  4. I like to play classical music while my students are writing. I FEEL it helps them focus on their writing and gives them a quiet, calm atmosphere to create.

Right now our writing stamina is at about 10-15 minutes. As we become better writer’s, our stamina will increase to about 30-40 minutes.

3) Conferring during Writer’s Workshop

 CCSD102

4) Sharing During Writer’s Workshop

We call it the AUTHOR’S CHAIR.

My students are placed into 4 groups. 10-15 minutes before we dismiss, we ask the 6 team members if they would like to READ or PASS. If they choose to READ, they get their journal and come to the big “TEACHER CHAIR”. They choose 1 story to share with us. Our emergent readers can tell us the story and then they show us their picture.

Later in the year, we will give one compliment and ask one question to the “AUTHOR”. They LOVE this! It is important to discuss “beginning writer’s” and “advanced writers”, ahead of time.

No hurt feelings and EVERYONE’S work is appreciated! 

Writer’s Workshop is a planned time during the day when students can create writing of their own.

During this time, guided writing small groups may be meeting with the teacher or individual conferences may be happening. Whatever your choice, embrace the attempts. The successes and the failures will make them better readers and writers. We learn from our mistakes. Hold them accountable. Quality work is always our goal.

 

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

These Writer’s Workshop resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

Writing Strategies

Writing Strategies

Writing Strategies

 

Launching Writer's Workshop the Book

Launching Writer’s Workshop the Book

Launching the Writing Workshop

So…Leave me a comment… What does Writer’s Workshop look like in YOUR classroom?

Also…  check out these WONDERFUL teacherpreneurs to connect with!

Sept, Teacher Talk

Check out these amazing teacher blogs on TEACHER TALK

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Rethinking Literacy in 2023

We get a “Literacy” DO-OVER : Modeled / Interactive Writing

2023 is the Year of LITERACY!

Because 2022 was so BAD….we get  DO-OVER!

We get a “LITERACY ” do-Over”!

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Keep reading to the bottom for a FUN FREEBIE

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

Ready to UPDATE your literacy block? 

Balanced Literacy: Here is your NEW YEAR’s PLAN!

*DISCLAIMER…  I know the Science of Reading is the NEW “go-to” for teaching Reading.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT! I am learning. I have been teaching reading to FIRST GRADERS for 30+ Years. AND I AM ALWAYS  LEARNING. SO… I hope YOU are open to new ideas & “reusing” OLD ideas to help our “littles” learn. If this helps YOU – Yeah! ( Jan. 2022). 

The Why? The What? and The How?

This Week:  Shared / Interactive Writing

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaboration.

A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Shared / Interactive Writing.

This week we jump into Shared & Interactive Writing!

You can’t THINK of Writing without thinking …

LUCY  CALKINS and others.

 

Shared Writing

During shared writing, the teacher transcribes the entire text while engaging students in a rich discussion about how the text should be composed.

  • Shared writing is taught to small groups or a whole class in briskly paced, 5- to 20-minute lessons.
  • First, develop and extend children’s background and language knowledge on a topic or experience of interest.
  • Establish a purpose for the writing and an intellectually engaging opportunity for students to apply new learning. Students might write a letter to a local newspaper or write directions for a new game they have developed.
  • Write the entire text yourself in front of students (using chart paper or document viewer) while requesting input from students regarding aspects of the writing where they most need to expand their expertise.

Think about what you have just read.

Ready to expand?  Here you go!

  • During the writing, model processes needed by your students. Have a small whiteboard available, for example, to demonstrate to students how to say a word slowly and write sounds heard into “sound boxes” (Clay, 2006) before writing a phonetically regular word into the text for them. 
  • Demonstrate in-the-moment revision during shared writing as necessary to construct a strong draft. Reread the text to students from time to time to discuss what needs to be written next to or to monitor whether or not the text conveys information clearly.
  • Do not deliberately make errors during shared writing. Model the immediate construction of a high-quality draft.
  • Read the completed text to students.
  • Post the text in an accessible spot in the classroom, and provide opportunities for students to read or use the text multiple times over the next several days or weeks.

Read Write Think

Shared writing is a process teachers use to help children to understand how to write a particular kind of text and to provide them with a model piece of writing to emulate. It involves a teacher producing some text on the board with input from the class. The students ” discuss and collaborate” while the teacher is the scribe.

The main difference between shared and interactive writing is who is holding the pen. In shared writing, the teacher holds the pen and serves as the scribe. The teacher also serves the roles of… summarizer of ideas, questioner, and prompting for quick decisions on spelling and print concepts.

Interactive Writing

Interactive writing is a cooperative event in which
teachers and children jointly compose and write text.
Not only do they share the decision about what they
are going to write, they also share the duties of
the scribe. The teacher uses the interactive writing session to model reading and writing strategies as he or she engages children in creating text.

Through questioning and direct instruction, the teacher focuses
the children’s attention on the conventions of
print such as spaces between words, left-to-right
and top-to-bottom directionality, capital letters,
and punctuation. Clay (1979)

Firstgradenest.com

Mrs. Richardson’s Class

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

These Interactive Writing resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

 

 

So…Leave me a comment… What does INTERACTIVE WRITING look like in YOUR classroom?

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Young children love to read during Reading Workshop

How to Prepare for a Successful Reading Workshop in First Grade

Reading Workshop

“Creating a Community of Readers”

When I teach reading, I don’t want my students to stop and ask for help.

I want them to have the skills to be independent readers.

I want them to be problem-solvers.

So, I am…

Making a Community of Readers

How to create a community of readers

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 How?

Before reading, take a sneak peek!

What do you do BEFORE reading?

*Frontload any vocabulary that may change thinking, distort comprehension, or is unfamiliar to them.

Take a picture walk. Cover the words.

Make them use visual cues in the story.

Have them make predictions

PRIOR to reading.

After reading, check their predictions.

After reading, think about it!

When you finish reading, do something!

 I LOVE this!

After reading..then what?

DO SOMETHING!

Reread it for NEW information.

Retell it to yourself or a friend.

We use our 3 fingers to retell.

I love this part…DIGEST IT!

Just as a good meal…when you are finished, appreciate it.

Think about it.

 ENJOY IT!

When you finish readin,g read it AGAIN!

Read MORE!

 You are NEVER done!

When you finish…read more!

My kiddos love to stack ALL of their books on the left..

as they finish reading a book…

place it in a pile on their right.

Keep reading!

Their goal is to

read more every day!

STAMINA!

Reading MATS are used to make goals.

Our goals are to read MORE!

Read with your eyes. No need for fingers.

Use your eyes to read…not your fingers.

 We want kids to quit using

their fingers to read.

Good readers use
their EYES!

“SCOOP” up words (phrases)

with your eyes.

When reading, put 3-4 words together

and read the phrases!

*GREAT time to teach

prepositions & prepositional phrases!

When reading, always reread the text for comprehension.

Always reread text

 Always, always…reread!

You will see more, read more, and understand more when you reread a story.

Read it to a partner, a

parent, or a friend.

The same book can sound new

when you are reading it

for the second or third time!


So there you are…

GET  READING!

Remember…

When in doubt…

ALWAYS make it

BALANCED  LITERACY

What part of a Balanced Literacy Classroom is reading?

For more early literacy

reading and writing resources

Check out

 1stgradefireworks

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Rethinking Literacy in 2023

We get a “Literacy” DO-OVER : Guided Reading UPDATE for 2023

And a FREE Balanced Literacy Resource to get you STARTED!

2023 is the Year of LITERACY!

Because 2022 was so BAD….we get  DO-OVER!

We get a “LITERACY ” do-Over”!

Keep reading to the bottom for a FUN FREEBIE

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Ready to UPDATE your literacy block? 

Balanced Literacy: Here is your NEW YEAR’s PLAN!

*DISCLAIMER…  I know the Science of Reading is the NEW “go-to” for teaching Reading.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT! I am learning. I have been teaching reading to FIRST GRADERS for 30+ Years. AND I AM ALWAYS  LEARNING. SO… I hope YOU are open to new ideas & “reusing” OLD ideas to help our “littles” learn. If this helps YOU – Yeah! ( Jan. 2023). 

This series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaborations. A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Guided  Reading.

Week 1:  We discussed Read Alouds.

Week 2: We discussed   Shared Reading.

This week we jump into GUIDED READING.

Let’s talk to teachers about Guided Reading.

Gay Su Pinnell and Irene Fountas  Video by: Kemberly Meriwether

Guided reading is subject to many interpretations, but Burkins & Croft (2010) identify these common elements:

  • Working with small groups
  • Matching student reading ability to text levels
  • Giving everyone in the group the same text
  • Introducing the text
  • Listening to individuals read
  • Prompting students to integrate their reading processes
  • Engaging students in conversations about the text

The goal is to help students develop strategies to apply independently. Work focuses on processes integral to reading proficiently, such as cross-checking print and meaning information, rather than on learning a particular book’s word meanings. (For example, a student might see an illustration and say “dog” when the text says puppy, but after noticing the beginning /p/ in puppy, correct the mistake.) During guided reading, teachers monitor student reading processes and check that texts are within students’ grasps, allowing students to assemble their newly acquired skills into a smooth, integrated reading system (Clay, p.17)

There has been a LOT of new research into GUIDED READING and SMALL GROUP reading for skills and strategies. I suggest YOU do some research into HOW to make small group reading work for YOU. SOR is a great place to start. GOOGLE IT! 🙂 

Here are some  SOR resources to help you start:

Emily Garcia    Education to the Core

Amanda Richarson  Mrs. Richardson’s Class

Tara West   Little Minds at Work

READ WRITE THINK

The Guided Reading Table

Guided Reading Table

What does a guided reading lesson look like?

It varies based on reading level, but here’s a general structure for a 15-20 minute lesson.

  • Students re-read familiar texts for several minutes. This is a great way to promote fluency!
  • For just a minute or so, the students practice previously learned sight words.
  • The teacher introduces the text.
  • The students read the text out loud or silently while the teacher coaches. They do not take turns reading; instead, each child reads the text in its entirety.
  • The teacher leads a discussion of the text.
  • The teacher makes 1-2 teaching points.
  • If time allows, students do a few minutes of word work or guided writing.

The Measured Mom

Scholastic has 4 Tips for Guided Reading Success:

  1. Establish Routines. Routines for The Lesson format ( this helps with TIME constraints ), routines for when Guided reading happens, AND routines for what the OTHER students are doing while the teacher is teaching at the table.

2. Make SMART  text choices. The text should provide multiple opportunities for students to apply strategies and skills you have identified for the group.

3.  Dive into INSTRUCTION. Before, during & after reading.

3.  Assess and Be Flexible.   Your groups should be fluid and should change as your students’ instructional needs change. That’s where informal and formal assessments come in handy.

Scholastic.com

Tips for Creating Miniature Guided Reading Anchor Charts

Conversations in Literacy

The Next Steps In Guided Reading

Kindergarten Chaos

 

Does guided reading stress you out? Are you having a hard time getting everyone back to your table and teaching tthem meaningful lessons? This post will offer a simple approach to guided reading that helps your to make a plan, organize yourself, and stay relatively stress free. Perfect for first, second and third grade reading teachers. {1st, 2nd, 3rd, grade, elementary school, reading, guided reading}

Guided Reading STRESS?

Learning Lessons  With Amy Labrasciano

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

These Guided Reading resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

The Next Step Forward in Guided Reading: An Assess-Decide-Guide Framework for Supporting Every Reader

Amazon

 

Reading Strategies (Amazon) 

So…Leave me a comment… What does GUIDED READING look like in YOUR classroom?

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Rethinking Literacy in 2023

We Get a “Literacy” DO-OVER : Independent Reading Updated for 2023

Read to the bottom for a  FREE Resource to get you started!

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

2023 is the Year of LITERACY!

Because 2022 was so BAD….we get  DO-OVER!

We get a “LITERACY ” do-Over”!

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Ready to UPDATE your literacy block? 

Balanced Literacy: Here is your NEW YEAR’s PLAN!

*DISCLAIMER…  I know the Science of Reading is the NEW “go-to” for teaching Reading.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT! I am learning. I have been teaching reading to FIRST GRADERS for 30+ Years. AND I AM ALWAYS  LEARNING. SO… I hope YOU are open to new ideas & “reusing” OLD ideas to help our “littles” learn. If this helps YOU – Yeah! ( Jan. 2022). 

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaboration.    A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire.

BALANCED LITERACY

This week:   Independent  Reading.

Week 1:  We discussed Read Alouds.

Week 2: We discussed   Shared Reading.

Week 3:  We discussed Guided Reading.

This week we jump into

INDEPENDENT READING.

Let’s talk about INDEPENDENT Reading.

DEAR, SSR, Silent Reading, RAH, etc…  Whatever you call it…we call it

INDEPENDENT READING!

Independent reading is a time when students read text with little or no help from the teacher. They are usually at their seats or in comfortable places around the classroom.

In my classroom, they may be at their desk, on a stool, in a rocker, or even…under a table or desk.

Only one rule… You MUST be reading!

IMG_9620-2B-25281-2529.JPG

Check out FLEXIBLE SEATING

Independent reading is children’s reading of text — such as books, magazines, and newspapers — on their own, with minimal to no assistance from adults. It can consist of reading done in or out of school, including purely voluntary reading for enjoyment or assigned reading for homework. There are strong associations between independent reading and reading achievement, and many researchers believe that independent reading plays a key role in the development of reading fluency (speed and ease of reading), vocabulary, background knowledge, and even spelling. Not surprisingly, motivation also is associated with independent reading; children who are interested in and motivated to read tend to do more independent reading. Unfortunately, children with learning disabilities in reading often do not read independently, because they tend to find reading effortful, may have trouble obtaining books at their reading level, or may have generally negative attitudes toward reading as a consequence of repeated failure.

Reading Rockets

IR involves the full participation of the teacher. This means the teacher is instructing, scaffolding, and conferring with students (Reutzel, Fawson, & Smith, 2008) during IR time. For example, the teacher educates students in how to select appropriate books, scaffolds student understanding of specific text types, and confers with students to assess their understanding of what they have read.

Literacy Worldwide

Make the TIME for Independent Reading

If you’re really looking for independent reading to be successful with your students, you’ve got to commit class time to it. Students always see what we value by how we approach it during class. And if we want to be certain students get something done, we have to do it during class.

How you make this time is up to you. Elementary classes that tend to have students all day long can have a special fixed time each day allocated to independent reading. Middle and high school classes can allot a small portion – perhaps 10 or 15 minutes – of a class period towards independent reading each day before putting the book away and focusing on the day’s lesson. Others might prefer to wait until Friday and spend the whole class period reading that day.

Teachhub

How to Get Kids to Read Independently at Home?

Each WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY  they bring their RAH folder back.

I have them choose 2 books…YES…2 books to put in their folder.

( I place a pile 20 or so, of books at each level … *disclaimer…right now I have 5 Guided Reading groups…

I group their PILES of books at the Guided Reading group level…

So they really are taking home books at THEIR reading level.

Just a little teacher  “nudge”  in the right direction!

They choose two books, put them in their envelopes, 

and put them in their cubbies.

They keep them for 2 nights…hence bringing them back WED. & FRI. 

We change them for two NEW books … and here we go again!

How to Get Kids to Read at Home

Tips to Bring Independent Reading Into The Classroom

So, how do you realize the benefits of independent reading in your own classroom? Here are a few ideas:

  • Build independent reading time into each student’s day whether in school or at home. Class time is especially effective since it provides students a distraction-free time in their day to read.
  • Offer a selection of books at each student’s reading level and from different genres and help them find books they might enjoy.
  • Let each student make a reading list of five books they want to read and set reading goals.
  • Find creative ways for students to share books with one another, including things like book clubs, video projects, blogs or discussion time.

Educationdive

Jennifer Serravallo answers ’10 Questions About Independent Reading’

Independent Reading Activities

If you’re like most people, after reading a really good book you want to tell someone about it; you want to share.  Let students share their excitement over books!

Here are 8 activities that will engage students in sharing what they read.

  1. Illustrate an important character or event in the story.
  2. Create an advertisement to promote the book.
  3. Have students pick out words they are unfamiliar with and make a word wall.
  4. Make a bookmark that represents the theme or main idea of the book.
  5. Write a question to the author or a character in the book.
  6. Have them illustrate their favorite part of the story.
  7. They can write a letter to a character.
  8. Have them make a connection to a life experience.

In summary…

  • Allow students CHOICE..choice of books & choice of the reading area.
  • Build-in time for independent reading EVERY day..model reading, too!
  • Debrief their independent reading time. DISCUSS it!

Tools that may be helpful:

Book Boxes for Independent Reading

Book Boxes for Independent Reading

Gallon Zip-Lock Bags for Independent Reading books.

Gallon Zip-Lock Bags for Independent Reading books.

HOW TO GET BOOKS for Independent Reading?

Use SCHOLASTIC BOOK CLUBS, Donor’s Choose, and/or garage sales to add to YOUR classroom library for independent reading books.

From Striving to Thriving

From Striving to Thriving

From Striving to Thriving

No More Independent Reading WITHOUT SUPPORT

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

Reading at Home

So…Leave me a comment… What does  INDEPENDENT READING look like in YOUR classroom?

FREEBIE

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

Slide1

 

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

We get a “Literacy” DO-OVER : Shared Reading

And a FREE Balanced Literacy resource to help you get STARTED

2023 is the Year of LITERACY!

 Because 2022 was so BAD….we get  DO-OVER!

We get a “LITERACY ” do-Over”!

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Rethinking Literacy in 2023

Ready to UPDATE your literacy block? 

Keep reading to the bottom of this post for a FREEBIE

Free for Followers

Freebie for Followers

Balanced Literacy: Here is your NEW YEAR’s PLAN!

*DISCLAIMER…  I know the Science of Reading is the NEW “go-to” for teaching Reading.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT! I am learning. I have been teaching reading to FIRST GRADERS for 30+ Years. AND I AM ALWAYS  LEARNING. SO… I hope YOU are open to new ideas & “reusing” OLD ideas to help our “littles” learn. If this helps YOU – Yeah! ( Jan. 2022). 

The Why? The What? and The How?

Balanced literacy has been defined as  “an approach designed to help individual students learn how to process a variety of increasingly challenging texts with understanding and fluency.” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2001)

Fountas & Pinnell have been the guiding resource for Balanced Literacy. Today we listen.

It is an approach to teaching. NOT a curriculum. It is HOW we teach our students to be independent readers and writers. It is NOT what books we use to teach them.

Balanced Literacy has been defined in “components” or  “pieces” of literacy instruction.

This series will focus on the components of a complete BALANCED LITERACY program. We will focus on clear and concise definitions. Definitions that educators can discuss in collaboration.

A “common language” where we can learn from each other and with each other.

The 8 components we will focus on are:

  1. Read Alouds
  2. Shared Reading
  3. Guided Reading
  4. Independent Reading
  5. Modeled / Interactive Writing
  6. Shared Writing
  7. Guided Writing / Writer’s Workshop
  8. Word Work

Each week we will focus on one area of Balanced Literacy and share experiences,  teacher tips, and resources to support and expand our Balanced Literacy repertoire. Start 2022 with the plans to implement BALANCED LITERACY!

This week:   Shared  Reading.

Last week we discussed Read Alouds. This week is about  Shared Reading.

How is shared reading different from a read-aloud?

Shared reading, involves quite a bit of pausing to teach or engage kids in practicing a skill. When doing a read-aloud,  go through the book a bit more quickly, stopping less frequently.

The other most important difference between shared reading and a read-aloud is that during shared reading, kids have their eyes on the print. During a read-aloud, you may show the pictures to students, but they are not usually able to see the words clearly. Since students can see the text during shared reading, you are able to teach things like decoding more easily.

Learning At the Primary Pond  

Shared reading is a part of the balanced reading model (read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading).

It is a 15ish minute block of time within that model that should be practiced daily.  Simply stated it’s the “We do.” part of the gradual release model.  This element is crucial.  It’s time for the teacher and students to practice together.

Mrs. Richardson’s Class

The READ ALOUD is done BY the teacher FOR the students.

Shared Reading is done WITH the students.

A Poem, a Big Book, A chart. Any text where the teacher and the students can see the text, and read it together.

Shared Reading

Shared Reading vs Read Aloud

Education.com

It is important to teach what “really matters” connected to a shared text. “We always want students to leave each reading experience enriched by the language and the text because of the shared approach, so we shouldn’t find hundreds of vocabulary words and instructional opportunities in a single text.

Some of  the many benefits of shared reading

  • building vocabulary
  • developing understandings of story structure
  • demonstrating reading strategies
  • entire-class reads a common text
  • all read the large text
  • high engagement

There are many types of print for Shared Reading.  Big books, charts, and poetry are some resources for teachers to read WITH students.

Here some great educators share their resources.

What is Shared Reading?

What is Shared Reading?

Learning at the Primary Pond

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

The Teaching Texan

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

Mrs. Wills Kindergarten

The main goal of shared reading is to engage students with the text. It is to share a reading experience. Everyone can read together and then participate in a rich discussion, writing, or response to the text.

In summary, Shared Reading is a reading experience where both teacher and students read a large text, together. A chart, a poem on a smartboard, or any other BIG text, where the teacher reads WITH the students using self-question and think aloud reading strategies. The goal is to model fluent and expressive reading. The students  INTERACT with the text while reading WITH the teacher and then through discussions, writing, and/or thinking for themselves.

These literacy posts may help in YOUR Balanced Literacy journey.

Balanced Literacy

Read At Home

Flexible Seating

Read Alouds

These resource books for TEACHERS may be helpful for YOUR reading.

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading with Big Books

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

Shared Reading

Kids with Capes

Kids with Capes

HamerayPublishing

I hope YOU are prepared to practice DAILY  Shared Reading in YOUR classroom!

Stay tuned for next week… Week 2 Guided Reading.

Please share with friends.

Leave me a comment…How do YOU use Shared Reading in YOUR classroom?

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Character Traits for Reading and Writing.

Let’s get EXCITED about Reading & Writing with Character Traits!

Character Traits.

(Yawn)

via GIPHY

Try beginning your lesson with that phrase for your PRIMARY STUDENTS!

Keep reading for a FREEBIE at the end of this post!  🙂

HUH? WHAT’S A CHARACTER TRAIT?

DID YOU SAY CHARACTER TRAIN????

Character Trait. Adjective. Describing word.

OH! I GET IT!

How to help our youngest readers and writers to add more DEPTH to stories?

How to help them analyze a story and determine the details of a character?

WHY?

I want my students to interact with story characters.

I want them to summarize, sequence, use inferences.

I want them to compare and contrast story elements.

I want them to draw conclusions, and problem-solve.

But most of all, I want them to LOVE reading and writing!

My little ones ( First Grade ) are just learning about print.

So, HOW do I help them discover the good/bad qualities of a story character?

And help them decipher the changes that can AND SHOULD, occur?

TALK. WHAT? TALK!

If you want your youngins’ to expand their knowledge base, YOU have to TALK!

TALK…READ….WRITE!

My newest product Character Traits for Reading & Writing , gives the teacher resources for discussion , printables for student work, and visuals for language acquisition.

All of the first steps for expanding vocabulary.

Speaking, Reading, Writing,

What a WONDERFUL World!

Character Traits for Reading & Writing. How to get your students interacting with story characters! 1stgradefireworks
Character Traits for young kids.
Character Traits for Reading and Writing. How to help young students interact with story characters through discussion, and new vocabulary.1stgradefireworks
Character Traits for Reading and Writing. How to help young students interact with story characters.
Character Traits for Reading and Writing. How to help young students interact with story characters with pocket chart and sorting cards. 1stgradefireworks
Character Traits for Reading and Writing. How to help young students interact with story characters through writing and text connections.
Character Traits for Reading and Writing. How to help young students interact with story characters through writing and text connections. 1stgradefireworks
Help YOUR students interact with story characters through CHARACTER TRAITS FOR READERS AND WRITERS
Help YOUR students interact with story characters through CHARACTER TRAITS FOR READERS AND WRITERS

Check out the PREVIEW VIDEO.

Click HERE to PURCHASE  

Try it with YOUR kiddos. Leave me some LOVE and let me know how it goes!

MY KIDDOS LOVE IT!

PS… I Left the word cards up at the writing center! They are adding new words to their writing, daily! WIN! WIN!

Need more GRAMMAR WORK?

Adjectives – Hide & Seek

Winter is WONDERFUL!

Nouns, Verbs, Adjectives 

 

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Free for Followers

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What TIME is it???

How many “times” today have you been asked…

WHAT TIME  IS  IT???

 
For me…
WAY  TOO  MANY!
 
And so…
WE  TEACH!
 
Hour hand.
Minute hand.
O’clock.
Thirty.
 
And OVER…And OVER…And OVER!
 
Big ones for WHOLE Group. 
Little Ones for Small / Independent Practice.
(Practice  MAKES   Perfect!)
 
To help out…
 
I have created a
MUCH   NEEDED  Packet.. 
for ME AND  For YOU!
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT  TIME  IS  IT  SNOWMAN?

 
These games will help my kiddos practice
Hour & Half-Hour
in 
MULTIPLE GAME  Formats!
 
 
Those who like SORTING…SORT!
Those who like a MATCHING GAME…MATCH!
Those who like to write..WRITE!
 
And so we work, we play, we practice!
 
And then…

 

WHAT  TIME  IS  IT??

 
RECESS!  LUNCH!  TIME TO GO HOME!
  
Check out my WINTER Pinterest board!
LOTS  of Winter GOODIES!
Data Collection, again!

Data Collecting sends SHIVERS DOWN MY SPINE!

Data Collecting!

 

The words that send

SHIVERS

down 

EVERY TEACHER’S

BACK!

WHY? HOW? WHEN?

Relax…take a breath…

go to your “HAPPY PLACE!”

 

Data Collecting is very important in education.

We as educators not only need to deliver the instruction, but we do have the need to ensure our students master and apply the knowledge we are delivering.
 
For me, it was a
CHANGE of  MINDSET.
When I change my lifestyle, I need a WHY?
Why am I doing this? Why is it needed? 
WHY?  WHY?  WHY?
 
BECAUSE.

 

Collecting data is NOT about the numbers.

It’s NOT about “judging” my teaching. It’s NOT about seeing 
HOW many of my students DID or DID NOT master a concept.
 
It’s about looking for those SMALL skills,
those giant holes,
those little tweeks that
are missing FOR THE CHILD! 
What areas are missing…so I can fill them!
 
IT’S NOT ABOUT ME???
 
NOPE!
 
It’s about the KIDS!
 
Data is to help our kids.
 
OK.   So  HOW?
 
There are a MULTITUDE of  assessments
that you can use. 
In this day and age, I bet your district has a LONG list of assessments
they want you to use.
USE them!
 
Don’t just give the test & move to the next lesson.
LOOK  AT  THE  DATA!
 
You might be surprised at what you see!
 
I recently gave a math assessment to my firsties.
We had spent 4-5 weeks (YES WEEKS) on place value!
Tens and ones.  Tens and ones.  
OVER  AND  OVER!
 
After my “district” math assessment,
I noticed a trend…
On 5-6 of the tests  ( 25%  of my class..)
they missed 3-4 questions about 
adding ten to a number.
 
WHAT? ADDING TEN IS EASY!
 
We had gone over tens & ones,
tens & ones…   BUT…
 
I “assumed”
…remember what they say about 
ASSUME…
 
that it would be easy for them 
because they understood place value!
 
So…a week later of
SMALL  GROUP   math
  …adding tens to numbers
 
SHAZAM!
 
100%  on the place value review test!
So what if I gave the review test again?
They didn’t get it the first time!
 
It is NOT important that 
OUR numbers
 look good to others!
 
What is important is
DO THE KIDS KNOW IT?
 
Knowledge vs. numbers.
 
WOW!
A New MINDSET!
 
If you are looking for some reading/writing assessments 
to HELP your kiddos…
THIS WILL HELP!
 
See how I use it 
 HERE

Are YOU a HELPER ELF?

It’s the 
MOST, WONDERFUL 
TIME OF THE YEAR!


I do not own this video. This video belongs to SantaKlaws67 http://www.youtube.com/user/SantaKlaws67

SANTA  CLAUS  IS COMIN’ TO TOWN!

I work at a low socioeconomic, Title 1 school.
This time of year can be very hard for some kids.
Some families DON’T celebrate Christmas.
Some families can’t afford gifts.
Some are VERY proud and won’t accept donations.
So…Santa doesn’t come to EVERY house.


via GIPHY

So today..we had  
THE TALK.

THE talk about what December, Christmas, and Santa
are REALLY  about.

GIVING & HELPING!

Today…we  became
HELPER  ELVES!

We talked about 
HOW we can HELP at HOME, 
at SCHOOL, 
and help our FRIENDS!
 
We talked about giving from the “heart”.
Our class meeting was SO enlightening!
My kids were SO engaged.
It was NOT about “ME..ME..ME”.
It was about “What can I do for OTHERS!”
 
Sniff..sniff..made tears of joy come to my eyes!
 
IT WAS AWESOME!
 
And so..
 
Santa, you can come to ROOM 3.
(I have a feeling…he will)
 
But for now..
 
WE WILL BE HELPING YOU,SANTA!
 
WE ARE HELPER ELVES!
 

 

 

 
To help YOU out..
 
I have some 
CHRISTMAS Goodies
for the classroom
in my TPT store.
 
 
Here is a FREEBIE
from my store!
 
MERRY CHRISTMAS, 
Helper ELVES!